Canada and Transboundary Fisheries Management in Changing Oceans: Taking Stock, Future Scenarios

An Ecology & Society Special Feature featuring four papers from OceanCanada members, titled: Canada and Transboundary Fisheries Management in Changing Oceans: Taking Stock, Future Scenarios.

Oceana: Untraceable: The Consequences of Canada’s Poorly Regulated Supply Chain

Article and report originally published at Oceana.ca Seafood is one of the most highly traded food commodities in the world. In Canada, a lack of transparency in seafood supply chains is masking hidden costs – to the economy, our fisheries sector, ocean health and global human rights. Global illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing is […]

Study results show fishing access is a barrier for BC harvesters

BC coastal communities rely on fishing to support their livelihoods, culture, and food security. However, increased pressure on resources and unfair regulations have put the many values gained from fishing — that Indigenous and non-Indigenous harvesters, business owners, and coastal communities depend on — at risk. One of the most significant and growing challenges they face are the barriers to access and benefit from available marine resources.

Highlights and policy implications of new economic report: “Protecting 30% of the planet for nature: costs, benefits and economic implications”

This is a collection of highlights from the press release. Find the full report here. The independent report “Protecting 30% of the planet for nature: costs, benefits and economic implications” represents the most comprehensive global assessment of the financial and economic impacts of protected areas ever completed. Based on work from over 100 experts, the […]

The COVID-19 Pandemic, Small-Scale Fisheries and Coastal Fishing Communities

The COVID-19 pandemic has rapidly spread around the world with extensive social and economic effects. This editorial focuses specifically on the implications of the pandemic for small-scale fishers, including marketing and processing aspects of the sector, and coastal fishing communities, drawing from news and reports from around the world. Negative consequences to date have included complete shut-downs of some fisheries, knock-on economic effects from market disruptions, increased health risks for fishers, processors and communities, additional implications for marginalized groups, exacerbated vulnerabilities to other social and environmental stressors, and increased Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated fishing.

Bridging the Knowledge Ocean: A Design Study of Knowledge Translation for the OceanCanada Initiative

In recent years, the research on ocean science has increased noticeably. Given the impact of this research, communities near the ocean may want to enrich their environmental knowledge to ensure our oceans’ future health. However, there is limited accessibility to this research; scientific information that might be publically accessible is often difficult to find and understand without proper background knowledge.

COVID-19 is a chance to end harmful fishing subsidies. Here’s why we must take it

Discussions are raging on where and how governments should apply stimulus for their post-COVID-19 economic recovery plans. Will they, for example, support economic sectors which we know are causing irreversible damage to the environment and the natural world, such as the fossil fuels sector? Or are the recovery plans a unique chance to finally bring our production and consumption patterns in line with environmental imperatives and commitments to sustainable development?

Estimating Global Catches of Marine Recreational Fisheries

Commercial fisheries catches by country are documented since 1950 by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). Unfortunately, this does not hold for marine recreational catches, of which only few, if any, estimates are reported to FAO. We reconstructed preliminary estimates of likely marine recreational catches for 1950–2014, based on independent reconstructions for 125 countries. Our estimates of marine recreational catches that are retained and landed increased globally until the early 1980s, stabilized through the 1990s, and began increasing again thereafter, amounting to around 900,000 t⋅year–1 in 2014. Marine recreational catches thus account for slightly less than 1% of total global marine catches. Trends vary regionally, increasing in Asia, South America and Africa, while slightly decreasing in Europe and Oceania, and strongly decreasing in North America. The derived taxonomic composition indicates that recent catches were dominated by Sparidae (12% of total catches), followed by Scombridae (10%), Carangidae (6%), Gadidae (5%), and Sciaenidae (4%). The importance of Elasmobranchii (sharks and rays) in recreational fisheries in some regions is of concern, given the life-history traits of these taxa. Our preliminary catch reconstruction, despite high data uncertainty, should encourage efforts to improve national data reporting of recreational catches.

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