Oceana: Small fish, big influence: the case for rebuilding capelin

Find the report here. Executive Summary The foundation of Canada’s blue economy is our wild fish populations. Forage fish – the small, schooling fish like herring, capelin and shrimp that feed larger predators – are vital contributors to wild fisheries in Canada. They are targeted directly in fisheries and contribute indirectly as prey to other commercially […]

The implementation gap in Canadian fishery policy: Fisheries rebuilding and sustainability at risk

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) established the Sustainable Fisheries Framework (SFF) in 2009 to help meet Canada’s international commitments towards sustainable fisheries management. The SFF is a suite of policies and tools intended to ensure the precautionary approach (PA) is incorporated into fisheries management. Seven years later (2016) a federal government audit by the Canadian Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development (CESD) found that although DFO had identified key components necessary for successful fisheries management in the SFF, it had failed to put these components in place for many stocks and did not always apply them even when they were in place.

TBTI: Call for contributions for a book on Canadian SSF

Originally article originally posted at Too Big To Ignore. ‘Thinking Big about Small-Scale Fisheries in Canada’ This e-book calls for research and perspectives on small-scale fisheries in Canada. We seek overviews, stories, and insights about actions local fisheries and fishing communities are taking to sustain themselves while dealing with changes. The United Nations General Assembly […]

Rashid Sumaila named University Killam Professor

Dr. Rashid Sumaila, professor in UBC Science’s Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries, as well as the School of Public Policy and Global Affairs in the Faculty of Arts, is one of six faculty members who have been named by UBC as a University Killam Professor. The University Killam Professorship is the highest honour that […]

Canada and Transboundary Fisheries Management in Changing Oceans: Taking Stock, Future Scenarios

An Ecology & Society Special Feature featuring four papers from OceanCanada members, titled: Canada and Transboundary Fisheries Management in Changing Oceans: Taking Stock, Future Scenarios.

Oceana: Untraceable: The Consequences of Canada’s Poorly Regulated Supply Chain

Article and report originally published at Oceana.ca Seafood is one of the most highly traded food commodities in the world. In Canada, a lack of transparency in seafood supply chains is masking hidden costs – to the economy, our fisheries sector, ocean health and global human rights. Global illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing is […]

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