Conservation, contraception and controversy: Supporting human rights to enable sustainable fisheries in Madagascar

Environmental NGOs are increasingly called upon to respect human rights when undertaking conservation programs. Evaluating a family planning program running alongside marine management measures in Madagascar, we find that family planning services provided by an environmental NGO can support women’s reproductive rights.

Towards a sustainable and equitable blue economy

The global rush to develop the ‘blue economy’ risks harming both the marine environment and human wellbeing. Bold policies and actions are urgently needed. We identify five priorities to chart a course towards an environmentally sustainable and socially equitable blue economy.

Updated estimates and analysis of global fisheries subsidies

The period from 2019 to 2020 is critical in determining whether the World Trade Organization (WTO), tasked with eliminating capacity-enhancing fisheries subsidies, can deliver to the world an agreement that will discipline subsidies that lead to overfishing. Here, following extensive data collection efforts, we present an update of the current scope, amount and analysis of the level of subsidisation of the fisheries sector worldwide.

Fisheries subsidies wreck ecosystems, don’t bring them back

In a major policy reversal, the European Parliament and the Council of the European Union are on the brink of lifting a ban from 2004 on subsidies for building new fishing vessels. Reintroducing these subsidies contravenes the international consensus to end them by 2020 in order to meet United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 14.6.

Ecological connectivity between the areas beyond national jurisdiction and coastal waters: safeguarding interests of coastal communities in developing countries.

The UN General Assembly has made a unanimous decision to start negotiations to establish an international, legally-binding instrument for the conservation and sustainable use of marine biological diversity within Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction (ABNJ). However, there has of yet been little discussion on the importance of this move to the ecosystem services provided by coastal zones in their downstream zone of influence.

A review of the fate of southern British Columbia coho salmon over time.

Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) were once a thriving species in southern British Columbia, acting as a source of food, livelihood, and recreation. Research on the survival and status of coho salmon in British Columbia has been critical since an unprecedented moratorium on Interior Fraser River stocks was put in place in 1998, leading to its designation as an endangered species. Since then, no comprehensive literature review has been undertaken on coho salmon. The present paper outlines current publication trends since the early 1990s, covering research areas that include the management and regulation of wild-capture coho salmon fisheries, hatchery enhancement efforts, as well as the pertinent factors that resulted in low returns. A complementary analysis did reveal a progressive downward shift in the total publication records pertaining, but not limited to, coho salmon in British Columbia. This review process identifies future steps and guidelines that policy makers and fisheries managers should take into account to improve the conservation outlook of coho salmon. Emerging technologies such as the use of genomic identification tools, more consistent and thorough data gathering processes, as well as reformed hatchery rearing practices, have all been identified as decisive action items.

Fishery subsidies: the interaction between science and policy.

Fisheries subsidies have attracted considerable attention worldwide since the 1990s. The World Trade Organization (WTO), among others, started to strengthen its disciplines in fisheries subsidies in 2001. The academic study of fisheries subsidies can play a key role in contributing to policy-making processes such as WTO negotiations by providing more accurate information on the link between subsidies and overfishing. This paper aims to review the existing academic literature and discuss the role of academic studies in the process of designing and implementing policies on fisheries subsidies. Academic studies on fishery subsides can be divided into three branches: descriptive, theoretical, and empirical. Overall, there has been significant progress in empirical studies on fishery subsidies during the last decade. While the number of studies is still limited, they generate insights that are consistent with theoretical predictions. As for potential contributions of academic studies to actual policies and sustainable management, more interaction between academic experts and policy makers is desirable.

Climate change impact on Canada’s Pacific marine ecosystem: the current state of knowledge.

Global warming is already affecting the oceans through changes in water temperature, acidification, oxygen content and sea level rise, amongst many others. These changes are having multiple effects on marine species worldwide, with subsequent impacts on marine fisheries, peoples’ livelihoods and food security.

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